February 25th 2017


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Articles from this issue:

COVER STORY Don't grieve dumped TPP; rather, thank Trump

CANBERRA OBSERVED Splintering of support gets under PM's skin

EDITORIAL What future has Senator Cory Bernardi?

ENVIRONMENT U.S. Congress to investigate shonky climate report

ELECTRICITY Green policies threaten energy security and jobs

ELECTRICITY A solution to South Australia's power crisis

WATER POLICY 450 gigalitres upwater not feasible on Murray-Darling

EUTHANASIA Dutch nursing home death: more excuses, more killing

CHARTICLES Carbon dioxide is turning the Earth a brighter green

EUROPEAN AFFAIRS Germany's new army: Will it roll the iron dice?

MUSIC Hitman parade: when singers go political

TV SERIES The personal subsumed: The Crown

HUMOUR Exciting publishing event

LETTERS

BOOK REVIEW Win the war, lose the peace

BOOK REVIEW Science under the thumb of ideology

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News Weekly current issue featured articles:

COVER STORY Don't grieve dumped TPP; rather, thank Trump
Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull’s first reaction to Donald Trump’s election was to express hope – even expectation – that the incoming U.S. President would not kill off the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), so called. However, the incoming President proved as good as his word. Almost immediately after taking office Mr Trump issued an executive order effectively proclaiming the TPP dead.
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CANBERRA OBSERVED Splintering of support gets under PM's skin
The continuing fracturing of Australian politics is symptomatic of an international phenomenon, the only difference being that Australia is coming relatively late to the party.
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EDITORIAL What future has Senator Cory Bernardi?
The resignation of South Australian Senator Cory Bernardi from the Liberal Party came at the worst possible time for Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull – on the day of the resumption of Federal Parliament for 2017, and just after the latest Newspoll put the Coalition 8 percentage points behind Labor.
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ENVIRONMENT U.S. Congress to investigate shonky climate report
The United States Congress will investigate America’s National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), following revelations by a senior climate scientist that the government agency faked evidence to claim that global temperatures had soared over the past 20 years, contradicting earlier evidence of a 20-year pause.
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ELECTRICITY Green policies threaten energy security and jobs
If you feel like you’ve just received an electric shock the next time you open your power bill, you can blame it in part on the Renewable Energy Targets (RETs). The taxpayer subsidies now funding state and federal RETs amount to $3 billion per year[1] and if governments continue to increase these subsidies, electricity prices will keep rising, affecting consumers and driving industry to the wall, or offshore.
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ELECTRICITY A solution to South Australia's power crisis
The crippling shortages of electricity that caused a statewide power blackout during storms across South Australia in 2016, and the power blackout to 40,000 homes and businesses around Adelaide during the recent heat wave, are signs of things to come.
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WATER POLICY 450 gigalitres upwater not feasible on Murray-Darling
The consequences of the 2016 flood flows should now make it blatantly obvious to the Murray-Darling Basin Authority (MDBA) and even to Tony Burke, Shadow Minister for Water, that the extra 450 gigalitres (equivalent to about one Sydney Harbour) of environmental water simply cannot be delivered with neutral or beneficial socio-economic impacts. Nor can that water be recovered mainly through on-farm efficiency measures, due to the vastly diminished critical mass of irrigation water left in the irrigation districts.
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EUTHANASIA Dutch nursing home death: more excuses, more killing
Once you create a situation at law where killing of another person is allowed in certain circumstances, not only will the circumstances in which such killing is endorsed or allowed change over time, but the boundaries, however originally drawn, will be entirely ineffective in providing moral, legal and ethical guidance and restraint.
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CHARTICLES Carbon dioxide is turning the Earth a brighter green
These two maps, published by the CSIRO in 2013, show that in the period 1982–2010, the amount of leaf coverage worldwide across arid areas in particular had increased by 11 per cent due to a process the scientific institution calls, euphemistically, “carbon dioxide fertilisation”.
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EUROPEAN AFFAIRS Germany's new army: Will it roll the iron dice?
Armed forces are one of the primary attributes of a nation state. Even the Vatican has the Swiss Guard to safeguard the Pope.
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MUSIC Hitman parade: when singers go political
Should musicians get involved in politics? During the recent U.S. presidential elections a spate of pop, rock and even jazz celebrities came to the conclusion that they very much should.
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TV SERIES The personal subsumed: The Crown
The Crown is a sumptuous historical drama that has as its nominal subject Her Majesty, Elizabeth the Second, Queen of the United Kingdom and the Commonwealth Realms.
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HUMOUR Exciting publishing event
We need your help. News Weekly’s editorial team has undertaken the task of compiling the much-needed revised edition of Forget’s Dictionary of Inaccurate Facts, Furphys and Falsehoods.
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LETTERS
Much theatre is being made as politicians wring their hands and point the finger to blame opponents over the current electricity crisis. However, nobody dares question what is clearly at the heart of the problem.
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BOOK REVIEW Win the war, lose the peace
He struck a gusher when he put together a consortium to take over the Texas Rangers, a baseball team that had fallen on hard times and, aided by some favourable rezoning, he made a considerable profit. From there he moved on to be governor of Texas. The main requirement of this office is that the incumbent does very little. Texans don’t like big government.
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BOOK REVIEW Science under the thumb of ideology
Science in the USSR was venerated, well taught and well funded, with many successes to its credit such as Sputnik, the first artificial earth satellite, launched in 1957, and Yuri Gagarin, the first man to journey into outer space in 1961.
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