January 30th 2016


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Articles from this issue:

COVER STORY Dyson report only partial answer to union problems

CANBERRA OBSERVED No urgency but Turnbull will want to make his mark

NATIONAL AFFAIRS SA pays price of solar and wind generation

FRENCH POLITICS AND ISLAM Kepel scathing of French elites, Salafists and far-right Islamophobes

ENVIRONMENT New bushfire tragedies: when will we ever learn?

RELIGION IN RUSSIA Betrayal: Curia no friend to Russian Catholics

HISTORY OF TAIWAN From pivot of Dutch trade to Japanese outpost

LIFE ISSUES Victoria enacts law based on lies told to Parliament

LIFE ISSUES Euthanasia: a false start to end-of-life issues

ETHICS Book traces foundations of true civilisation

RELIGION AND SOCIETY A welcome in truth for the same-sex attracted

CINEMA The beauty beyond fear: The Good Dinosaur

BOOK REVIEW Secularism mars insights

BOOK REVIEW A novel for the remnant

LETTERS

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LETTERS




News Weekly, January 30, 2016

A good read

Sir,

Malcolm Turnbull is going to have some difficulty in recovering from the Colebatch onslaught (News Weekly, December 5, 2015).

Suddenly, the old adage which declared that were one not a socialist at 18 one would be a scoundrel, but if one were still a socialist at 40 one would be about eight different kinds of idiot, springs to mind.

Where is Tony Abbott?

Fifteen cheers for Brian Coman and his expose of Greens’ Idiocy. As one steeped in genuine conservation which I have practised with all my meagre capital and effort for the past 23 years (no dollar profit but plenty of “feel good”) I am probably a bit un-Christian in despising the dills who think green is wholesome when it is the most selfish attitude one can have.

Enough of this. Thanks for a good year’s reading.

Errol Wiles,
Babinda, Qld.

Climate scientists peddle phantoms

Sir,

I could not concur more with Robert Bom’s warning (News Weekly Letters December 5, 2015) against accepting current statistical trends as valid predictors of the future.

Statistics, if properly gathered, can reliably tell us about the situation now and reliably describe past trends, but they cannot reliably predict future trends in biological and geophysical matters because these are “reliably”, as past records show, subject to changes of rate and direction due to forces of which we have no foreknowledge.

The very fact that climate scientists presume to predict 20 or 30 years into the future without modifying statements, such as “if current trends continue unchanged”, brands them as having no understanding of the legitimate use of statistical trends; or if they do, as deliberately misleading the public at whom their reports and analyses are aimed.

In either case, we should treat their prognostications with caution, and suit our reparative actions, if act we need, not to what might happen in 30 or 50 years time, but to what has happened in the last two or three decades.

We should deal with problems as they occur, not aim at manufactured targets so remote that we will be, in effect, fighting with phantoms.

Lucy Sullivan,
Celbridge, Ireland

Sunshine v moonshine

Sir,

Labor and the Greens say they believe in the science of climate change. The problem is that when we look at and scientifically analyse the drivers of climate change, only one really stands out – the sun’s cycles.

Try as we might, and I and others have asked several well-known scientists and each of our federal parliamentarians, we can find no real science linking carbon dioxide to more than a tiny, tiny effect on global climate.

There are many influences, but a series of papers peer reviewed by members of the politically run club and a raft of failed predictive computer models enable the planet to destroy the position of those promoting the risk of dangerous warming caused by anthropogenic CO2.

Look at the facts and also follow the related money trails in academia and industry and world politics.

Robert Brooks ASTC, FAusIMM, CPMin, MIEAust, CPEng, (ret),
NM. mining engineer,
Waggrakine, WA

Paris climate infamy

Sir,

The Paris climate agreement will go down as the greatest day of infamy since Pearl Harbour.

It is stupefying in the extreme that around 200 nations have pledged to fight alleged global warming by spending $1.2 trillion – yes, trillion – per year ad infinitum. All this to fight a problem that hasn’t actually manifested itself in any harmful way to the vast majority of people on the planet.

Meanwhile in the real world, millions face death from starvation, disease and homelessness, not to mention many more lives being lost because of terrorism.

Can you imagine the great progress that would be made in eliminating poverty, disease and homelessness if nations spent trillions of dollars on dealing with these important issues and in having to report back every five years on the progress made?

It would be possible with this sort of commitment that these very real problems would be eradicated within a couple of decades.

History will judge this generation most severely for making some critical errors regarding the over-zealous pursuit of environmentalism. Once in place, renewable energy targets and subsidies, low-carbon economy policies and such like are likely to stay in place long after they will have clearly been seen to have failed to achieve the unachievable.

Alan Barron,
Grovedale, Vic.

Why silence on thorium?

Sir,

The issue of the acceptable site to deposit nuclear waste has dominated media attention for several weeks.

When will our political leaders or media stimulators remind the masses of the potential, which is being ignored, for the use of thorium nuclear power generation? Not only does thorium yield up to 40 times more energy per unit than uranium, but it burns its own waste product and cannot be misused for the development of weapons of mass destruction.

Why are we silent?

Tom King,
Brisbane, Qld.




























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