July 27th 2019


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Articles from this issue:

COVER STORY Fixing Australia: Can we trust the Morrison Government?

ENERGY Yallourn early closure more than a mere challenge, Mr Premier

CANBERRA OBSERVED Can Labor learn a lesson or is it unredeemable?

NATIONAL AFFAIRS High power prices lead to more deaths of elderly

GENDER POLITICS Catholic Ed's document strong on doctrine, weak on protocols

ENERGY Renewables do push up power price: Chicago economists

OBITUARY The eminence of Dr Joe Santamaria

HISTORY OF SCIENCE Faith and reason and Father Stanley Jaki, Part 6: Medieval Christendom sparks a revolution

ENVIRONMENT As many Pacific islands are rising as are sinking

ASIAN AFFAIRS Uyghurs lose in ethnic power play

POETRY AND HISTORY The epic of the White Horse

HUMOUR On patrol with Father Bruce

MUSIC Joao Gilberto: Carrier of melodies

CINEMA Crawl: Toothful entertainment

BOOK REVIEW America's postwar boom and its end

BOOK REVIEW The story of the drafting of a great document

BOOK REVIEW The facts behind an undying distortion

LETTERS

POETRY

Books promotion page

OUR DAILY BREAD:
The Essential Norman Borlaug

Noel Vietmeyer

$54.00


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by Noel Vietmeyer

(Bracing Books, 2012)
Hardcover: 284 pages

ISBN: 9780578095554

Price: AUD$54.00

 

 

Book description

In the late 1960s a sudden surge in wheat and rice caught the world by surprise. Experts had proclaimed that the world could produce no more food, and that continued human population growth signified an inevitable and never-ending global famine.

Behind the unexpected leap in cereal production stood a humble Iowan who had been born half a century earlier with no prospects other than to spend his life growing the food to feed his own family. This book tells the almost miraculous series of events by which Norman Borlaug found his way from obscurity to the pinnacle of humanitarian achievement.

Today Borlaug is shaping up as one of the most important role models for world stability. Back in the 1960s when his seeds hit the international scene, the human population was 3 billion and global food production had flat-lined. Then India, to mention just one example, began planting his seeds and went from producing 12 million tonnes of wheat to over 80 million tonnes per year. Borlaug’s gift powered similar increases in almost a hundred wheat-growing nations. And his seeds are also why India and China no longer have famines, which in turn is why both have become superpowers.

 

About the author

During a long career at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC, Noel Vietmeyer produced over 30 books describing innovations that can benefit Africa, Asia and Latin America. He was also a prolific freelance writer, producing some 200 articles for publications such as National Geographic, Reader’s Digest, Smithsonian, Encyclopaedia Britannica, World Book, International Wildlife and Ranger Rick.

Through his National Academy of Sciences service Vietmeyer met Norman Borlaug, the hero of our age and the main reason why the world can feed 7 billion people.


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