February 23rd 2019


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Articles from this issue:

COVER STORY Something rotten led to fish-kill: perhaps fishy environmentalism

EDITORIAL Resistance grows to Beijing's soft-power push

CANBERRA OBSERVED Climate change: deadly ... to political leaders

TECHNOLOGY Electric cars: UK taxpayers subsidise rich greenies

BANKING ROYAL COMMISSION A step too small?

CYBER SECURITY Chinese smartphone threat extends way beyond Huawei

SOCIETY Such grandeur of spirit

POLITICS John Hewson should have as sturdy a Constitution

FINANCE Hayne royal commission sets agenda for bank reform

FAMILY RELATIONS Dad: a girl's first and most influential love

COMMENTARY Words gone feral: rights and equality

MEDICINE AND CULTURE Book captures tragedy of falling foul of a fanatic

SOCIETY AND CULTURE A dog's life: reflections of a grey nomad

HUMOUR

MUSIC Serialism a killer: Ideas tend to get in the way

CINEMA Cold Pursuit: Revenge served up manic

BOOK REVIEW Why the West and nowhere else

BOOK REVIEW The escalation of horror and atrocity

LETTERS

FAMILY AND SOCIETY The end of Liberalism

Books promotion page

OUR DAILY BREAD:
The Essential Norman Borlaug

Noel Vietmeyer

$54.00


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by Noel Vietmeyer

(Bracing Books, 2012)
Hardcover: 284 pages

ISBN: 9780578095554

Price: AUD$54.00

 

 

Book description

In the late 1960s a sudden surge in wheat and rice caught the world by surprise. Experts had proclaimed that the world could produce no more food, and that continued human population growth signified an inevitable and never-ending global famine.

Behind the unexpected leap in cereal production stood a humble Iowan who had been born half a century earlier with no prospects other than to spend his life growing the food to feed his own family. This book tells the almost miraculous series of events by which Norman Borlaug found his way from obscurity to the pinnacle of humanitarian achievement.

Today Borlaug is shaping up as one of the most important role models for world stability. Back in the 1960s when his seeds hit the international scene, the human population was 3 billion and global food production had flat-lined. Then India, to mention just one example, began planting his seeds and went from producing 12 million tonnes of wheat to over 80 million tonnes per year. Borlaug’s gift powered similar increases in almost a hundred wheat-growing nations. And his seeds are also why India and China no longer have famines, which in turn is why both have become superpowers.

 

About the author

During a long career at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC, Noel Vietmeyer produced over 30 books describing innovations that can benefit Africa, Asia and Latin America. He was also a prolific freelance writer, producing some 200 articles for publications such as National Geographic, Reader’s Digest, Smithsonian, Encyclopaedia Britannica, World Book, International Wildlife and Ranger Rick.

Through his National Academy of Sciences service Vietmeyer met Norman Borlaug, the hero of our age and the main reason why the world can feed 7 billion people.


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