May 30th 2020


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Articles from this issue:

COVER STORY Why success has eluded our automotive industry

EDITORIAL Will survival instincts drive new industry policies?

CANBERRA OBSERVED What's China's beef with our barley?

MANUFACTURING Reversing a bad trend

PUBLIC HEALTH Inquiries needed into major covid19 outbreaks

NATIONAL AFFAIRS ABS makes employment figures bend over backwards

NATIONAL AFFAIRS Green 'charities' continue to undermine development

NATIONAL AFFAIRS Royal commission denies Principle of fairness to Cardinal Pell

REFLECTION Woman is ... the answer to a question

ECONOMICS Breaking the shackles of deep globalisation

TRADE AND INDUSTRY Alarm bell is ringing loud on China's trade threats

ASIAN AFFAIRS Taiwan an island of sanity in a sea of contagion

COVID19 LOCKDOWN Should churches be the first to reopen?

HUMOUR Troubling sino-signs at batflu press conference

MUSIC Let's be thankful for small mercies: No Eurovision!

CINEMA Onward: Recovering the everyday magic

BOOK REVIEW KEEPING HANNAH ARENDT CURRENT AND ARENDT'S THESIS ON SAINT AUGUSTINE

BOOK REVIEW SKEWED VISION OF DEMOCRACY

POETRY

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HOME POLITICS TO WORLD TRADE

Bill Barry

$39.95


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Book description

Bill Barry was a close witness to one of the most significant events in Australia’s political history. He is the son of William “Bill” Barry, who resigned from the ALP when the party split in 1955, and became leader of the Labour Party (Anti Communist) in the Victorian Legislative Assembly, later the Democratic Labor Party (DLP). This move effectively ended his political career.

Barry junior gives an intimate picture of the beginnings of the Split and believes it is beyond reasonable doubt that ALP leader Herbert “Doc” Evatt started the process that led to the Split when he moved to expel the anti-communist Industrial Groups (“Groupers”) from the ALP. Evatt denounced the Victorian Groupers, and put the blame on the “malign influence” of B.A. (Bob) Santamaria, leader of the Movement.

Barry junior writes that although the aims of the DLP and Bob Santamaria’s Movement coincided to a great degree, especially in the epoch when the communist threat was very real, Barry senior was not notably involved with Santamaria’s Catholic Social Studies Movement. The relationship, Barry junior clarifies, between the DLP and the Movement, today’s National Civic Council (NCC), was not always harmonious. Sometimes the two they cooperated, sometimes they did not.

Barry had a happy childhood, inferring that his father had a soft heart, although others report that he had a “good line in invective and was not short of ambition”.

 

About the author

Bill Barry spent many years with the Trade Commissioner Service, and when he “retired, returned to work with the Australian Chemicals Specialties Manufacturers Association (ACSMA) and the Australasian Fleet Management Association (AFMA). When with the Trade Commissioner service, Barry worked, among other places, in New York, and in San Francisco during the Summer of Love. He helped establish the market for Australian wines in Canada, which is now one of the largest markets for our wines. And he also promoted Australian exports to Iran, in a period of relative tranquility.

Bill Barry’s father, William Peter (“Bill”) Barry, led the Democratic Labour Party (DLP) in the Victorian Legislative Assembly after the ALP Split in 1955.


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